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The problem-solving presentation

 

Disciplines > Sales > The sales presentation > The problem-solving presentation

Description | Example | Discussion | See also

 

Description

The problem

First describe the problem that the customer has. They may well already know this and you will have identified it from previous discussions.

Ensure that they agree that this is a problem and that it needs solving. As necessary, show them the implications of not solving the problem and highlight the pain caused.

The cause

Show them the main causes of the problem (making sure that these can be fixed using your solution). Use words like 'because' and 'causing'. Make it the links between causes and the problem very clear, showing that addressing causes will resolve the problem.

If possible use one cause. If necessary use a few. Avoid using more than a few causes.

The solution

Show how your product addresses the causes and hence fixes the problem. Show independent reports that prove this. Demonstrate it to them if at all possible.

Example

A car sales person asks why the customers are looking for a new car. The customer tells how the current car is expensive to run.  The salesperson explains how some cars are not designed for easy service and others have inefficient engines. He then shows them a report that highlights running costs of different cars and then demonstrates models from the top two cars in the list.

Discussion

Showing why something happens is a powerful act as it plays to the need to explain. Causes thus provide a bridge to a solution that otherwise might appear 'magical' and driven solely by the salesperson's desire to sell.

If you use too many causes, this may confuse the customer and maybe make them think of more causes that your product does not resolve.

See also

Cause-and-effect reasoning, Objectivity principle

 

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