changingminds.org

How we change what others think, feel, believe and do

 

Disciplines

 

Techniques

 

Principles

 

Explanations

 

Theories

 

 

Home

 

Blog!

 

Quotes

 

Guest articles

 

Analysis

 

Books

 

Help us

 

Links

 

 

Please help
and share:

 

Four interpretations of addiction

 

Explanations > Addiction > Four interpretations of addiction

Disease | Rational self | Primrose path | Divided self | See also

 

Herrnstein and Prelec (1992) offer four
interpretations of addiction:

Addiction as disease

Addiction as disease suggests that the addict literally cannot help themselves in the same way that a person with a disease cannot help becoming ill.

The opposite of this is addiction as choice, where the person makes conscious decisions to indulge in the behaviour that eventually becomes addictive. Even when addicted, they have choice in deciding to fight the addiction. There are companies such as Narconon that offer help in the fight to overcome addiction.

Although this is still prevalent in social conversation, modern addiction research has, to a large extent, discredited this 'disease' model.

Addiction as rational self

This model views the addict as a rational consumer who chooses to partake of the addictive behavior from a position of constant free will.

The current view is that whilst consumption may start as a rational choice it gradually becomes less as the addict becomes attached to the target addictive substance.

There is also the question as to whether there is ever completely free will. Recent research has highlighted how the subconscious brain activates in a decision before the conscious brain.

Addiction as a primrose path

This model interprets addiction as as an unknowing process whilst the person indulges in pleasant activities. The person slips gradually into dependence without realizing what is happening until it is too late.

Addition as divided self

This has as multiple-personality viewpoint where the 'addict' appears as a  separate aspect of the self. It assumes that people hold inconsistent preferences, either concurrently or successively. This leads them to both seek rational behavior whilst also taking the irrational steps of an addict.

See also

Identity

 

Herrnstein, R.J., and Prelec, D. (1992). “A theory of addiction,” in Choice Over Time, G.Loewenstein and J. Elster (eds.), New York: Russell Sage Press.

 

More Kindle books:

And the big
paperback book


Add/share/save:


 

 


Save the rain


 

 


SalesProCentral

 

Contact Caveat About Students Webmasters Awards Guestbook Feedback Sitemap Changes

 

 

Quick links

Disciplines

* Argument

Brand management

* Change Management

Coaching
+
Communication

Counseling

Game Design

+ Human Resources

+ Job-finding

* Leadership

Marketing

Politics

+ Propaganda

+ Rhetoric

* Negotiation

* Psychoanalysis

* Sales

Sociology

+ Storytelling

+ Teaching

Warfare

Workplace design

 

Techniques

+ Assertiveness

* Body language

* Change techniques

* Closing techniques

+ Conversation

Confidence tricks

* Conversion

* Creative techniques

* General techniques

+ Happiness

+ Hypnotism

+ Interrogation

* Language

+ Listening

* Negotiation tactics

* Objection handling

+ Propaganda

* Problem-solving

* Public speaking

+ Questioning

Using repetition

* Resisting persuasion

+ Self-development

Sequential requests

Stress Management

* Tipping

Using humor

* Willpower

Principles

+ Principles

Explanations

* Behaviors

+ Beliefs

Brain stuff

Conditioning

+ Coping Mechanisms

+ Critical Theory

+ Culture

Decisions

* Emotions

Evolution

Gender

+ Games

Groups

+ Identity

+ Learning

Meaning

Memory

Motivation

+ Models

* Needs

+ Personality

+ Power

* Preferences

+ Research

Relationships

+ SIFT Model

+ Social Research

Stress

+ Trust

+ Values

Theories

* Alphabetic list

* Theory types

 


  Changing Minds 2002-2013

  Massive Content -- Maximum Speed

TOP