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Would you call yourself...?

 

Disciplines > Job-finding > Interview questions > Would you call yourself...?

The question | What they are looking for | How to answer | See also

 

The question

Would you call yourself creative?

How organized are you?

Would you say that you are particularly good at managing people?

Do you like managing people?

What they are looking for

This question usually gives a very loud hint at some quality they are seeking.

Very occasionally, this is a trick question and they are checking for over-focus in one area. They are most likely to ask this type of probe if you have already established strengths in this area or it is mentioned a number of times in your CV/resumι.

How to answer

Assuming that you have determined that they are seeking this quality, affirm that you have these qualities and give examples to support this.

Yes, I would say I am organized. For example, I spend fifteen minutes each morning planning the day and fifteen minutes in the evening integrating the day's learning into future plans.

Beware of over-stating your abilities and avoid arrogance. Do not make yourself out to be the greatest manager in the world or a creative genius if you are not.

Indeed, I am an excellent manager, probably better than you, too. [Don't say this!]

A way of emphasizing ability without boasting is to show enthusiasm.

I love to work with my people, to challenge them and help them succeed beyond both our and their expectations.

Another great way is to show how other people think you have the required qualities.

The General Manager told me last week that she liked the creative approach I took in resolving the recent crisis.

Some qualities are very useful sometimes but too much can be bad. You can show that you have the quality and also know when to use it.

Yes, I would say that I can be very creative when the occasion calls.

See also

 

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